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What is a pandemic? Worldwide spread of a new disease A virus that can cause illness or death Sustained person-to-person transmission of that virusThe focus is not only on containment, but increasingly on the mitigation of the spread of the COVID-19​
We're shifting into a mitigation phase, which means that we're helping communities understand you're going to see more cases. Unfortunately, you're going to see more deaths but that doesn't mean that we should panic. Dr. Jerome Adams US Surgeon GeneralWhile mitigation does not preclude containment, it will mean anticipating and preparing for the surge of patients that will be entering hospitals. This -- not the daily case count -- is the most urgent issue facing the United States, as well as many other countries. Dr Sanjay Gupta CNN Chief Medical Correspondent.
When a nursing home facility has an outbreak, regardless if it is flu, norovirus or COVID-19, Sacramento County Public Health immediately begins the investigation process to follow the communicable disease exposure of others, and will monitor or isolate those individuals until they are no longer contagious, Dr. Peter Beilenson Sacramento County Department of Health Services Director​.
Answering your questions: Why did Sacramento County move to mitigation of COVID-19?: Answer: Public health officials have recommended to move Sacramento County onto mitigation of the virus. The distinction is important because it shifts the focus from labor-intensive “contact-tracing” – the process of trying to track down every person a known COVID-19 infected person has had contact with since they contracted the virus, to trying to protect the most vulnerable populations from contracting the virus. These new measures will include ending 14-day quarantines simply based on contact exposure and applies to the general public, as well as health care workers and first responders. This decision will free up public health resources to protect the most vulnerable populations.
For health confidentiality, in compliance with HIPPA, Sacramento County Public Health does not release location of identifying information of individuals​
Best practices: Employers should reaffirm with employees that they need to stay home if sick. Where appropriate and feasible, employers may also recommend teleworking to employees. Masks are only recommended for sick persons to wear in an effort to avoid spreading germs into the air. Masks are not recommended for healthy persons, as they require face touching and they will not stop the contact of germs unless fitted properly by a professional.
COVID-19 Mitigation FAQs​
COVID-19 For the latest information and resources for schools, employers, health care provers and laboratories from Sacramento County Public Health, visit: http://covid19.saccounty.net or call 916-875-5881​
High Risk Populations: Elderly, namely those 60 or older People with underlying medical conditions such as COPD, heart, lunch or kidney disease, other respiratory conditions; and Those that have compromised immune systems
Mitigation: If a person does not have symptoms, they do not need to quarantine. If a person is showing symptoms – fever, cough, shortness of breath, they are advised to stay at home from work or school until free of symptoms for 72 hours or after seven days from the start of symptoms, whichever is longer Those that are high risk with symptoms should contact their doctor Those severely ill should go to the hospital
​Preventing the spread of COVID-19If you are feeling ill, with any symptoms, stay home from work or school until free of symptoms, a minimum of seven days from the start of symptoms Maintain social distance – at least six feet -  and avoid handshakes or hugs If you or your child have a fever or cough, do not visit elderly family members If you are elderly, or in the high risk category, avoid going into public spaces or hosting visitors​
When to see a doctor:Those with cold-like symptoms who can manage their symptoms at home with over-the-counter medications should do so, regardless of whether they have a cold, the flu, or COVID-19.If you develop any difficulty breathing with fever or cough, contact your health care provider right away or call 911 if you feel you are in imminent danger.​
Best practices:Employers should reaffirm with employees that they need to stay home if sick. Where appropriate and feasible, employers may also recommend teleworking to employees. Masks are only recommended for sick persons to wear in an effort to avoid spreading germs into the air. Masks are not recommended for healthy persons, as they require face touching and they will not stop the contact of germs unless fitted properly by a professional.​​​​
Implement social distancing measures: Reduce the frequency or postpone large gatherings (e.g. assemblies) and limit the number of attendees per gathering. Alter schedules to reduce mixing (e.g. stagger recess, entry/dismissal times)Limit inter-school interactions. Consider distance or e-learning in some settings. Short-term dismissals for school and extracurricular activities as needed for cleaning and contract tracing. Students at increased risk of severe illness should consider implementing individual plans for distance learning, e-learning.
Encourage staff to telework (when feasible), particularly individuals at increased risk of severe illness. Implement social distancing measures. Increase physical space between workers at the worksite. Stagger work schedules. Decrease social contacts in the workplace (e.g. limit in-person meetings, meeting for lunch in a break room, etc.). Limit large work-related gatherings e.g. staff meetings, after work functions. Limit non-essential work travel
Community and Faith-Based Organizations. Implement social distancing measures: Determine ways to continue to provide support services to individuals at increased risk of severe disease (services, meals, checking in) while limiting group settings and exposures. Cancel large gatherings (e.g., more than 250 people) or move to smaller groupings. Small gatherings held in venues that do not allow social distancing of six feet per person should be postponed or canceled. This includes gatherings in crowded auditoriums, rooms or other venues. For organizations that serve high-risk populations, cancel gatherings of more than 10 people
Public Health Departments. May reduce contact tracing if resources dictate, prioritizing those in high-risk settings (e.g. healthcare professionals or high-risk settings based on vulnerable populations or critical infrastructure). Continue COVID-19 testing of symptomatic persons; however, if testing capacity limited, prioritize testing of high-risk individuals. Encourage healthcare professionals to more strictly implement phone triage and telemedicine practices
Healthcare Settings and Healthcare Providers. Implement changes to visitor policies to further limit exposures to healthcare personnel, residents, and patients. Changes could include temperature/symptom checks for visitors, limiting visitor movement in the facility, etc. Implement triage before entering facilities (e.g. parking lot triage, front door), phone triage and telemedicine to limit unnecessary healthcare visits. Actively monitor absenteeism and respiratory illness among healthcare personnel and patients. Actively monitor personal protective equipment (PPE) supplies. Establish processes to evaluate and test large numbers of patients and healthcare professionals with respiratory symptoms. Consider allowing asymptomatic exposed healthcare personnel to work while wearing a facemask. Begin to cross train healthcare professionals for working in other units in anticipation of staffing shortages.
Individuals and Families at Home Guidance. Continue to practice personal protective measures, such as: Washing hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. Avoid close contact with people who are sick. If a person is showing symptoms—fever, cough, shortness of breath, they are advised to stay home for a minimum of seven days from the start of symptoms.  Gatherings of individuals who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 should be limited to no more than 10 people. This includes gatherings such as those at retirement facilities, assisted living facilities, developmental homes, and support groups for people with health conditions. People at higher risk for COVID-19 complications are adults who are 60 years or older and individuals with several chronic medical conditions like heart, lung, or kidney disease.